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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:23 pm 
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Location: Ottawa, ON, CA
I started collecting vinyl way back when I was probably 10 or 11 years old. In fact, I think my first album that I ever owned was AC/DC Back in Black. Then it was on to Black Sabbath, and that got me hooked on metal forever. Then in my early teenage years I discovered The Sex Pistols and The Clash, and it was punk, and eventually Hardcore, then Thrash Metal. By the time I was 19 I probably had 1000's of LP's. Rare German and Japanese punk and metal pressings, obscure underground stuff, clear vinyl, coloured vinyl... The whole bit. Then the 90's came along, and it was CD's (perfect sound forever!). By 1995 my turntable had stopped working, and I probably couldn't have even found a new one if I wanted to. I went to the local pawn shops and used record stores and unloaded my entire collection. Cue forward to my middle-age years, and vinyl is in resurgence, and I was in full-on audiophila, always looking for better sound. I started to kick myself on a daily basis for unloading all my records, and wondering if I had inadvertently pawned away a collection that could have been my retirement fund.

So, last year, I finally succumbed and bought a turntable. It was a Sony something or other, that had a built-in preamp. Not exactly entry level, but not crazy expensive either. Call it middle of the road (in my world). I promised myself one thing when I bought it: I wouldn't re-buy recordings I already had in another format. That promise lasted about a week, when I was at Sunrise, and saw my some of my favourite records on vinyl. I had to buy them. Pretty soon I was spending way more money than what was logical or sane on recordings I already had, or records that I had in my youth. The madness had begun. To take the madness even one step further, I even removed my music server and DAC from my music room and said "This is it, all analogue for me from now on".

It was fun, and it was nostalgic, but then that thinking started to creep in... "how do I make this sound better?". So I bought a new, outboard phono pre. Then I started looking at upgrading the cartridge. I was chasing a dragon. It didn't sound nearly as good as my digital/DAC source that I had been using for years. I tried to convince myself otherwise, but I was fooling myself. Besides the fact that I found my digital setup better sounding, I realized that, at my core, I am a lazy bastard, and I don't want to get up and flip a record over, or look for the tiny little groove for my favourite song.

So, to make a long story short. The turntable is gone. The records are all sold. And I had a brief, fun, but ultimately expensive trip down memory lane.

Time to upgrade my DAC.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2012 4:17 pm
Posts: 2893
Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
I can relate in many ways. I moved away in 86 and sold all the gear, but thought my albums were still in my father's basement. Learned later they had long been removed, but I hadn't done anything about it.
some 25 years later; marriage, kids and mortgage taking priority I start to really listen to music again and purchased a new set up. it grew, upgraded and then one day I heard Ricky Lee Jones coming from a room at a dealer's and new immediately that it was vinyl. First time to hear vinyl in over 20 years. Simple table for some 40 or 50 records of my youth was the plan. Didn't hold though. Upgrades and a second table.
What is different now though is each time I purchase an album I am sure it is one I want as I can first stream them as few are the ones from my youth as my listening has changed. vinyl is here to stay for me for the foreseeable future though.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:07 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:50 pm
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Location: dundas, ON, CA
They'll pry the vinyl out of my cold dead hand , I would say more but I'd get banned. :!:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:36 pm 
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Location: Thornhill, ON, CA
Not sure why but hardware and software, probably spent $10k on records since Jan '17.

This madness has to stop. I spend average $100/wk at Sonic Boom.

Eventually II'll just stay home and enjoy them. Or buy into Sonic Boom!

Turntable, MC cart, phono preamp, cables, RCM...make that >$11K! And most of the stuff was preowned.

I can sum it up to this: it's like collecting sports or Pokemon cards, you get the paper, the art, the reading material. No chewing gum but you get music!!!

I learned many years ago that a well produced recording played thru a good quality system can be a great experience. Some of my vinyl is noisy, but even then sometimes the original vinyl copy is more fun to listen to. In some cases I have the CD copy of the same recordings to enjoy a different experience. In recent years all of my old Gentle Giant records were released/remastered on CD and I am just listening to them now. But I still cherish the original copies. The gatefolds and,fancy sleeves and art work really were a big part of the experience.


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Last edited by racecars on Thu Oct 11, 2018 5:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:45 pm 
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Location: Brantford, ON, CA
@Dmitchell

My experience is that it depends largely on the master...if the digital sounds good then sometimes the record doesn't or reversed...

For example, I bought the new Priest on LP, sounds amazing..much better than the 24 bit digital release. Night and day difference...why can't they put the LP master out to buy digitally...instead you get a MP3 download which is totally squashed.

1 win for new vinyl.

Next, Matthew Good's latest release, digital is okay...vinyl sounds like they just turned off the treble.

1 win..sort of for digital

The problem is that we the consumer get raped buying music only to have it suck. :roll:

BTW, I like to sit on the couch and play digitally because it's so convenient...I wish I could find a good FLAC of the LP masters but then difference in equipment from one user to another, besides who has the time to digitize and fix all the meta data or even take out the clicks? :|

Essentially, if you're a music lover the studios got you beat...now you're buying 2 copies...LP for dynamics and digital for convenience...unless you're OK with MP3 downloads.

Bottom line, give me the best master in ANY format. By best I mean dynamic huge soundstage that is involving and cranks on a home stereo NOT earbuds.

Rant done...I will put my rose coloured glasses back on now :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 8:18 am
Posts: 6684
Location: Toronto, ON, CA
I never had many records when cds came in. I bought most of my LPs as they were going out of the shops. I did well in the early 1990s. But I started buying cds around that time as well.

For me, CDs are really great for classical and instrumental music as well as modern jazz (ECM). But for rock, I always preferred LP.

I did a big cull recently to get down under 2400 LPs and under 800 cds. Literally donated hundreds of lps and cds.

But the LP bug is hitting me again.

I will be hitting Records on Wheel in Dundas on the weekend to check out the classical haul. I have a list but mint condition European and Japanese classical LPs are my kryptonite. I have a hard time not buying these. I spent literally hundreds at TAVES last year on an incredible haul. God help me at next week's audio show if they have mint used classical records (The Audio Sensibility table last year was insanely good).


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:53 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2009 8:54 am
Posts: 136
Location: Stratford, PE, CA
Eventually II'll just stay home and enjoy them. Or buy into Sonic Boom!

I think you my already have! We don't have anyone selling CDs here on PEI. It is vinyl only at the only record store in town.

Recently I was in Moncton,New Brunswick at Champlain Place,the biggest mall in Atlantic Canada. They have a Sunrise Record Store. I wander in the the jazz section,13 cds later I leave happy.What a selection. The staff were laughing at my excitement.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 757
Location: toronto, ON, CA
racecars wrote:
Not sure why but hardware and software, probably spent $10k on records since Jan '17.

This madness has to stop. I spend average $100/wk at Sonic Boom.

Eventually II'll just stay home and enjoy them. Or buy into Sonic Boom!

Turntable, MC cart, phono preamp, cables, RCM...make that >$11K! And most of the stuff was preowned.

I can sum it up to this: it's like collecting sports or Pokemon cards, you get the paper, the art, the reading material. No chewing gum but you get music!!!

I learned many years ago that a well produced recording played thru a good quality system can be a great experience. Some of my vinyl is noisy, but even then sometimes the original vinyl copy is more fun to listen to. In some cases I have the CD copy of the same recordings to enjoy a different experience. In recent years all of my old Gentle Giant records were released/remastered on CD and I am just listening to them now. But I still cherish the original copies. The gatefolds and,fancy sleeves and art work really were a big part of the experience.


I am pissed with Sonic Boom right now, I was there recently and look up the wall left side once you are in passed main entrance before the stair case going down the basement.They have a nice collection of old art work hanging on the wall.I see a nice colorful sign with garage band on it ,never heard of the band but the girl on the art work was sexy.The whole picture was sexy.I see closer ,and long and behold it is written and printed in Greece from some concert (circa mid 80s but art was meant to remind 60s Rockers ,Mod scene vibrant and colorful) ,well damned I am Greek I want it. I went over to the counter to find out the price thinking to myself ,it will be too expensive for sure.I asked the clerk,skinny atrophic boy,pimples on the face ,the whole look,he probably though he was too cool to work there,he says to me in kind of a rude voice. <<< Not for sale>>> F #%$@45^ bad luck.
Cheers
George


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2014 2:06 am
Posts: 438
Location: toronto, ON, CA
Elton John was at Sonic Boom recently buying records
Dixie Records has decent selection and prices for used records
I still do okay on used records at garage sales once and a while.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:13 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:02 pm
Posts: 157
Location: Sleepy Hollow, NS, CA
I grew up with records, and never got rid of any of mine when CDs came into vogue. I even bought some that others were unloading for as little as a buck, sometimes less.

I don't limit myself to records though since to me it's all about the music. It's not about having the best sound system solely for impressing others, or a music collection that the masses might think is cool. Your sound system and your music should be a personal thing for your own enjoyment above any other considerations.

Fads come and go, and collecting "vinyl" is just that for some.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:07 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:09 pm
Posts: 1563
Location: Sherbrooke, QC, CA
dmitchell wrote:
I started collecting vinyl way back when I was probably 10 or 11 years old. In fact, I think my first album that I ever owned was AC/DC Back in Black. Then it was on to Black Sabbath, and that got me hooked on metal forever. Then in my early teenage years I discovered The Sex Pistols and The Clash, and it was punk, and eventually Hardcore, then Thrash Metal. By the time I was 19 I probably had 1000's of LP's. Rare German and Japanese punk and metal pressings, obscure underground stuff, clear vinyl, coloured vinyl... The whole bit. Then the 90's came along, and it was CD's (perfect sound forever!). By 1995 my turntable had stopped working, and I probably couldn't have even found a new one if I wanted to. I went to the local pawn shops and used record stores and unloaded my entire collection. Cue forward to my middle-age years, and vinyl is in resurgence, and I was in full-on audiophila, always looking for better sound. I started to kick myself on a daily basis for unloading all my records, and wondering if I had inadvertently pawned away a collection that could have been my retirement fund.

So, last year, I finally succumbed and bought a turntable. It was a Sony something or other, that had a built-in preamp. Not exactly entry level, but not crazy expensive either. Call it middle of the road (in my world). I promised myself one thing when I bought it: I wouldn't re-buy recordings I already had in another format. That promise lasted about a week, when I was at Sunrise, and saw my some of my favourite records on vinyl. I had to buy them. Pretty soon I was spending way more money than what was logical or sane on recordings I already had, or records that I had in my youth. The madness had begun. To take the madness even one step further, I even removed my music server and DAC from my music room and said "This is it, all analogue for me from now on".

It was fun, and it was nostalgic, but then that thinking started to creep in... "how do I make this sound better?". So I bought a new, outboard phono pre. Then I started looking at upgrading the cartridge. I was chasing a dragon. It didn't sound nearly as good as my digital/DAC source that I had been using for years. I tried to convince myself otherwise, but I was fooling myself. Besides the fact that I found my digital setup better sounding, I realized that, at my core, I am a lazy bastard, and I don't want to get up and flip a record over, or look for the tiny little groove for my favourite song.

So, to make a long story short. The turntable is gone. The records are all sold. And I had a brief, fun, but ultimately expensive trip down memory lane.

Time to upgrade my DAC.


Sanity is a hard sell here. :lol:

-- 12 Oct 2018 09:09 --

Crosscut100 wrote:
They'll pry the vinyl out of my cold dead hand , I would say more but I'd get banned. :!:



You would get banned for defending vinyl on this site, really?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:11 am 
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Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 6:49 pm
Posts: 186
Location: Toronto, ON, CA
I was just visiting my brother and was contemplating taking a boxed and unused turntable back with me. It's a higher end turntable with moving coil cartridge, so it's no slouch. Yet, I would need a phono pre-amp of the same caliber and then start a new record collection. Financially it would start to add up.

There was certainly the nostalgic feeling to listening to records again but would this carry on today? Would I get the same thrill I did when I purchased a vinyl record when I was in my youth? Maybe the fantasy is better than the reality. In the end I decided let sleeping dogs lie and pass on the turntable.

I have said before when I have done my own comparisons, vinyl wins out 9 out 10 times for sounding better than digital. Yet, there is more to it than just listening. There is the cost as I mentioned, the hassle of changing albums every 22 minutes, and the care of cleaning and clicks and pops which are inevitable, all play a part in my decision making process.

The one thing I am grateful for is that we have a choice. If you like vinyl, great, you have the opportunity. If digital is your thing, lots of options. For some, they have both, which can be a win win. For me I will just keep listening to digital at least for the near future.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:39 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2010 5:56 pm
Posts: 1387
Location: Milton, ON, CA
Energyguy999 wrote:
@Dmitchell

My experience is that it depends largely on the master...if the digital sounds good then sometimes the record doesn't or reversed...

For example, I bought the new Priest on LP, sounds amazing..much better than the 24 bit digital release. Night and day difference...why can't they put the LP master out to buy digitally...instead you get a MP3 download which is totally squashed.

1 win for new vinyl.

Next, Matthew Good's latest release, digital is okay...vinyl sounds like they just turned off the treble.

1 win..sort of for digital

The problem is that we the consumer get raped buying music only to have it suck. :roll:

BTW, I like to sit on the couch and play digitally because it's so convenient...I wish I could find a good FLAC of the LP masters but then difference in equipment from one user to another, besides who has the time to digitize and fix all the meta data or even take out the clicks? :|

Essentially, if you're a music lover the studios got you beat...now you're buying 2 copies...LP for dynamics and digital for convenience...unless you're OK with MP3 downloads.

Bottom line, give me the best master in ANY format. By best I mean dynamic huge soundstage that is involving and cranks on a home stereo NOT earbuds.

Rant done...I will put my rose coloured glasses back on now :wink:



Well said, bang on!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:52 am 
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Posts: 192
Location: Kitchener, ON, CA
To each their own. All formats have their pros and cons. I don't own a CD player because with digital streaming and downloads I don't see a point of owning CD as well.

I personally prefer vinyl. Yes it's a lot less convenient and has maintenance also the cost can be higher than digital but at the end of the day to me vinyl just sounds much more involving and entertaining than digital.

I also love the thrill of the treasure hunt for used vinyl. It's exciting to find old favorites in the used bin. I try to keep the new vinyl purchases down because it can add up quick at $40+ per album, and thanks to the great mastering that many studios do these days the album on vinyl can end up sounding like crap.
I've had much much better luck in terms of quality with old 60s-70s records.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:57 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 7:23 pm
Posts: 1652
Location: Ontario, ON, CA
dmitchell
Your record player with a built in pre wouldn't give you the quality of sound that you can actually get from vinyl, so it's no wonder your digital end sounded better.

As you said getting into vinyl is costly. You need the table, cartridge, phono pre, a set of phono cables, ic cables from phono pre to pre and a powercord for the phono stage, record cleaning machine. Once you hit a certain level in those aquasitions it is sonic bliss.

I sold my cd player in 2012 and never looked back.


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