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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 2:52 pm
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
Hello fellow CAM members.

I recently moved into a new home with an unfinished basement and looking to build a dedicated listening room.
The previous owners did a DIY job and put up some poor quality walls so Im currently listening in a partially enclosed room that is 12W x 22L x 8H.

The listening room will be part of a larger reno project to be started in late spring. I need advice in configuring the room best suited to 2 channel listening and wonder if anyone can suggest a company or service who works in the residential market.

Thanks very much to those who reply.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:54 am
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
You don't need any professional company to build the dedicated listening room for you. Since you are in the basement, you just need soundproofing material in the ceiling, walls and good quality thick carpet and padding.

Wired at least 2 20A dedicated lines to the front of the room. If possible, make it a bit wider like at least 15 ft. The length of 22ft. is good enough.

PM me for more info. if you like. I live in Markham as well.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 1:17 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 12:47 pm
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Location: Leduc, AB, CA
Check out the listening room page on the Cardas website. For a 8 foot ceiling, the golden dimensions would be 21'x13'x8'. I built my room according to this theory and it's the best audio decision I've ever made. Just follow the instructions for speaker placement. It's all about avoiding canceling and reinforcing bass frequencies. This is the easiest way to a flat response profile in your room. With the wrong dimensions you can spend endless hours and lots of money experimenting with room treatment.

You don't have to listen from the apex of an equilateral triangle; you can experiment by simply backing off your chair. Once you figure out where to set the centre of the bass drivers, the real experiment is toe-in. Once you get that figured out, measure the three distances from the back corners of the enclosures (2 to back wall and 1 to side wall) and cut pieces of 1"x2" to these lengths for the times you may have to move the speakers.

You might also want to consider half or three quarter inch MDF behind the drywall; don't forget to back off the studs if you go that way. You could also consider studding on one foot centres. Put as much soundproofing in the ceiling as you can.

The room is the most important part of a sound system; that's because speakers are usually the weakest link. Most people are unfortunately stuck with less than ideal environments and are always wondering what they can do about it. Even with the best speakers, a bad room will negate much of their design advantage. You can avoid these nagging issues interfering with your listening by simply starting off with a Golden Ratio room. If you get the theory right, the practice gets a lot easier. Good Luck!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 2:53 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 7:23 pm
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Location: Ontario, ON, CA
You can do some research here at http://www.acoustics101.com which will provide you with everything you need to know. I built my room around 6 years ago. I used resilient channeling and lot of safe and sound. I have 3 layers of safe and sound in the ceiling.
You can have a movie or music right up and people can still sleep. Acrylic caulk every dry wall joint before mudding.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 5:51 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2012 6:29 am
Posts: 192
Location: Toronto, ON, CA
a) make space rigid and closed room
b) remote the electronics into a rack nowhere near the speakers
c) Wire a dedicated circuit and power all from this.
d) Hardwire data and tv and outdoor fm antenna to this rack.
e) plan for multiple integral subwoofers if you want fast, low distortion wide bandwidth low frequencies. Structural build in is best.
f) if forced air heat ensure quiet low pressure ducts
g) many light fixtures ring esp. when lamps are dimmed. Pay attention to quality of light fixtures and consider mechanical damping


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 6:45 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 8:43 am
Posts: 947
Location: Burlington, ON, CA
In terms of layout, I have to agree that considering the Cardas method is a good one. Lots of excellent advice out there about that.

Agree 100% with the use of Roxul Safe n Sound in the joist bays. Consider double drywall for ceiling and use green glue between layers.

I put all the gear in a media closet at the back of the room. Compromise that requires long speaker cables in my case.

I would avoid the use of pot lights if you really want to keep the room sounding isolated.

I used a solid core Safe n Sound door at the entry to the room, and weather stripping, and a door sweep.

Many simple and affordable ways to help sound proof.

_________________
Give me a musical system and a PC front end

Mark in Burlington


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 7:33 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:29 am
Posts: 494
Location: St.Catharines, ON, CA
Bodie,

How much structure born noise are you willing to tolerate upstairs?
Isolation down to 20Hz is gonna cost ya.

Gary


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 7:43 am 
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Location: London, ON, CA
http://amroc.andymel.eu/?l=19&w=15&h=8&ft=true&re=ITU%20listening%20room

I use this site whenever looking a potential houses to buy. Lots of good info and many different tools to analyze room ratios.

interestingly the Cardas golden ratio for a 8 foot ceiling isn't the best according to this tool.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 8:00 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:29 am
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Location: St.Catharines, ON, CA
Bolt area.
Couldn't find table13-2.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 8:14 am 
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
My system runs on a dedicated 20amp lines - had the sense to have the electriian run those lines when we did the 1st round of renos.
Very probable to need sound insulation down to 20hrz.
My issue is Im not a DIY guy so YES, would love to save $$ but I have spent $$$$ on my system and the room demensions/materials etc need to be done to compliment my system.
Like most listeners in the basement, its the lower bass extension that needs the most attention. Not only for the listener but so the family isnt held hostage by the sound emanating. I do like it pretty loud.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 8:43 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:29 am
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Location: St.Catharines, ON, CA
Check out the Kinetics Noise Control site to see what you're getting into.
Sales office in Cambridge.

Gary


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 8:52 am 
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Location: London, ON, CA
Bodie wrote:
My system runs on a dedicated 20amp lines - had the sense to have the electriian run those lines when we did the 1st round of renos.
Very probable to need sound insulation down to 20hrz.
My issue is Im not a DIY guy so YES, would love to save $$ but I have spent $$$$ on my system and the room demensions/materials etc need to be done to compliment my system.
Like most listeners in the basement, its the lower bass extension that needs the most attention. Not only for the listener but so the family isnt held hostage by the sound emanating. I do like it pretty loud.


Speaking as a business owner that has built many deducted theatre and sound rooms if you want control down to 20hz and still want the room to sound good you absolutely will need a pro in front of you as that/this is a tall order.
My experience has proven that you can get rooms to control sound down way low or you can build rooms that sound good but to get both requires some serious planning and build tech...

Not to discourage but to suggest you either need a pro or a shiet load of homework... Good luck , I hope you find a way.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 9:55 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 5:46 pm
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
I agree with the previous posts. I just finished my listening/HT room in my basement. 20 foot wide, 16 deep, 8 foot ceilings. It took about 3 months to get everything (sound attenuation, speaker isolation pads, etc) sorted out but I now have a great "neutral" room with no booming, nice sound projection, a wide "sweet spot", and great sound. Another vote for safe and sound; buy lots and use it everywhere! If there is a cavity anywhere in the house, stuff some S&S in it! Your ears (and your family) will thank you. As I am in Markham as well, you are welcome to come by, give a listen, and discuss your plans. I pre-wired everything (speakers, etc,) and added separately grounded (isolated) power to the HT cabinet I built in.....what I WISH I had done was to install a power conditioner upstream (in the breaker panel area) and wire directly to the outlets.....I messed up and drywalled, painted etc before I realized my mistake....so I have the conditioner located in the cabinet....but it would have been more elegant to have hidden it with the breaker panel.

Good luck and you can really have a great sounding room with a little work.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:05 am 
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Location: Oakville, ON, CA
Serious question. Should a room that has been designed and built specifically for HT and which has turned out great for HT also sound great for two-channel music? My 2-channel is in my HT room and while the HT is awesome, listening to music, the room seems too "dead" for my liking.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:13 am 
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
brownslane wrote:
I agree with the previous posts. I just finished my listening/HT room in my basement. 20 foot wide, 16 deep, 8 foot ceilings. It took about 3 months to get everything (sound attenuation, speaker isolation pads, etc) sorted out but I now have a great "neutral" room with no booming, nice sound projection, a wide "sweet spot", and great sound. Another vote for safe and sound; buy lots and use it everywhere! If there is a cavity anywhere in the house, stuff some S&S in it! Your ears (and your family) will thank you. As I am in Markham as well, you are welcome to come by, give a listen, and discuss your plans. I pre-wired everything (speakers, etc,) and added separately grounded (isolated) power to the HT cabinet I built in.....what I WISH I had done was to install a power conditioner upstream (in the breaker panel area) and wire directly to the outlets.....I messed up and drywalled, painted etc before I realized my mistake....so I have the conditioner located in the cabinet....but it would have been more elegant to have hidden it with the breaker panel.

Good luck and you can really have a great sounding room with a little work.


Was this a DIY project?
With so much contradictions in good natured suggestions, how did you know what materials to use. For example, I was told S and S wasn't going to provide the correct insulation. Was told to use fire retardant drywall....etc.

-- 06 Jan 2017 14:16 --

I have enough knowledge and advise network but that said, a hands on approach is what will eliminate as many error factors as possible.

I'm not a DIY guy and would screw up as a labourer or contractor


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