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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 2:00 pm 
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Location: Niagara Region, ON, CA
Hi: I am once again thinking about soundproofing my basement listening area,mainly the 12'x24' ceiling using Roxul Safe n Sound between the ceiling joists and then using drywall de-couplers,such as GenieClips,WhisperClips,Quietclips,not really sure which ones yet,plus some channeling to go in the clips,plus some Green foam tape on the mounting surface between the drywall and channeling,finally with some sort of 5/8" sound proofing drywall. Where can I buy these close to Niagara Falls?
Does anyone have experience with these drywall de-coupling clips,as I am not sure which ones to go with? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks,Huck


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 2:38 pm 
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I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 3:11 pm 
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I double layered Roxul S&S between my ceiling joists when I put my sound room in the basement.I couldn't give up any head height in the basement so I screwed 5/8 dry wall to the ceiling.Not the Resilient channel you are talking about.This did an amazing job but of course it was not 100%.
You could go through some of the extra steps Newmusic did.How ever you are going to find that most of the sound bleeding out of your room is traveling through your duct work.You will hear sound in the return ducts of you adjoining upstairs room.Also keep in mind that if you use recessed lighting
(halogens) in your ceiling the extra Roxul could help to over heat things.Of course with all the LED options now this might not be the case as they run much cooler.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 4:02 pm 
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Location: Niagara Region, ON, CA
newmusic wrote:
I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.

Thanks...seems to me that all my ceiling joists will have to be checked to see if they are all the same dimensions and level with each other before I do anything,as right now it has drywall and I can see a few spots where the ceiling is out. I would like to run all my stereo wiring in the walls also.
I would need 35-40 Genie Clips according to their chart,so they must be at least $6.00 each?
Can the channeling be bought some place local....Lowe's,Home Depot?,how about soundproof drywall? I don't want to go too crazy,just enough to keep the little woman happy upstairs watching her t.v.! Thanks,Huck


Last edited by Huck on Sun Sep 28, 2014 4:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 5:17 pm 
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Huck, ti keep the wife happy, get her wireless headphones!

All the high tech materials in the world wont do squat if they are not installed according to the instructions. Bear that in mind before you start overboard. If you do it yourself, make sure you are thorough and follow the instructions, not your interpretation of the instructions. Seal all gaps around the edges; the largest source for sound leakage for the 65% of folks who do not have air ducts.

If you use a contractor, make sure that you get references from people he has installed similar products for and make sure that you actually follow-up on those references with an on-site visit to hear for yourself. This will also tell you if your expectations are reasonable or not in terms of soundproofing.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 5:27 pm 
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newmusic wrote:
I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.

CAM post of the month.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 7:45 pm 
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OBI56 wrote:
Huck, ti keep the wife happy, get her wireless headphones!

All the high tech materials in the world wont do squat if they are not installed according to the instructions. Bear that in mind before you start overboard. If you do it yourself, make sure you are thorough and follow the instructions, not your interpretation of the instructions. Seal all gaps around the edges; the largest source for sound leakage for the 65% of folks who do not have air ducts.

If you use a contractor, make sure that you get references from people he has installed similar products for and make sure that you actually follow-up on those references with an on-site visit to hear for yourself. This will also tell you if your expectations are reasonable or not in terms of soundproofing.


Huck is lucky, he is in Ontario that is where Mr.Mike Holmes lives and if you want something done right he is the man.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 8:10 pm 
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:roll: I agree 100% Mike Holmes is da man.

-- 28 Sep 2014 04:11 --

:roll: I agree 100% Mike Holmes is da man.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 10:06 pm 
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Location: Caledonia, ON, CA
Huck wrote:
newmusic wrote:
I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.

Thanks...seems to me that all my ceiling joists will have to be checked to see if they are all parallel before I do anything,as right now it has drywall and I can see a few spots where the ceiling is out. I would like to run all my stereo wiring in the walls also.
I would need 35-40 Genie Clips according to their chart,so they must be at least $6.00 each?
Can the channeling be bought some place local....Lowe's,Home Depot?,how about soundproof drywall? I don't want to go too crazy,just enough to keep the little woman happy upstairs watching her t.v.! Thanks,Huck


Yes, put some serious time and thought into what wiring you want to run, long before you start with the channel and drywall. I ran CAT 6 and HDMI cables in every imaginable direction. In case I want to add a projector to a wall of my choice in the future. I also ran speaker wire in both directions for surround sound, just in case I wanted to change the orientation to another wall in the future.
In addition I installed several electrical conduits in both directions to accommodate any future desire to move my audio/video system to another wall. Each conduit has a rope inside protruding out each end, so that I may pull any wires through that I require. Cheap and effective way to future proof.

Yes the channeling can be bought locally. If you are only going with two layers of drywall then as thick as possible is essential. 1/2 will be a waste of your time. The most important part is the green glue in between the layers. This turns two sandwiched layers of drywall into something more resembling concrete, absolutely no resonance. Check the demo room at Wilrep.
There is such a thing as soundproof drywall, like the kind Mike Holmes uses for dividing walls in attached condo's. This stuff is at least a couple inches thick and has a steel sheet running through the middle. One layer is equivalent to something like 7 layers of 1/2" without green glue. But one sheet will cost you about the same price as 10 sheets of 1/2". And of course the weight requires 3-4 men to lift it into place.

I thought I would have leaking of sound through my vents into other rooms upstairs. I was prepared to install the in-line duct mufflers that Wilrep custom manufactures. But after installing Roxul and mass loaded vinyl around the tunnel and all the connected ductwork, I could hear no leakage upstairs and so skipped the mufflers. More obvious was sound leakage around wallboard joints and seams. But this was eliminated after liberal application of acoustical caulking in corners, around the bottom perimeter of the room and into the seams at the edges of electrical boxes and wiring holes. Forget about pot or recessed lighting, you can't install it if you want to soundproof.

Don't forget to add solid core doors with sweeps on the bottom. Silver tape to make all ductwork sheet metal seams air tight. Adding some new or even dedicated ac lines and several additional outlets is always a good idea before the drywall goes up. And possibly the biggest bang (seriously, just try it), for the least amount of money, the $5 thin flexi-foam sealant tape that closes the tiny air gap between the outer edge of a door and the inside of its frame.

Have fun... :D


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2014 3:21 am 
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Thanks to all that commented! Now for some serious thinking ! Huck


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:17 pm 
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Im'e pretty happy that I found a way to condense over a year of research into just two posts. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 4:16 pm 
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Location: Niagara Region, ON, CA
I guess it's time to resurrect this old post of mine! After doing nothing about this room for almost a year,I finally got my butt moving and made the move and ordered 80 GenieClips from Wilrep,at least I have some parts for the ceiling for now,along with resilient channel and Roxul Safe-N-Sound,possibly 5/8" drywall yet to be ordered.......hopefully not another year will go by?!
Not sure which LED recessed lights to go with....something that won't interfere electrically(noise,buzz) with the audio system. Don't like the noise,buzz/flckering of regular bulb dimmers,not sure if the led dimmers or dimmable led's are any quieter? Huck


Last edited by Huck on Tue Sep 08, 2015 6:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 5:45 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 7:19 am
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Location: London, ON, CA
newmusic wrote:
I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.


I'm more than a little confused here.... First of all I have a commercial drywall / contracting company and have never heard of 7/8" drywall or ever heard of the very esoteric 1" varietal on a residential build... Ever .... Perhaps there is but it has never been spec'd on any of my projects....not so sure...Secondly it was mentioned that these 4 layers of 7/8" are hanging on resilient channel , that is roughly 11.5 pounds per ft by my calculation even if such a creature exists. Resilient channel is rated by the OBC to be exceptible up to approx 3 pounds per foot.... Now if we add approx another 1 pound per square foot with the addition to mass loaded vinyl we are north of 12 pounds per square foot.... A 10'x10' ceiling would then conservatively weigh 1200 pounds on something rated for around 300.... I assume the room is larger which is even more troublesome ..... If in fact this isn't a fairy tale

If this is true or even if the poster is mistaking 5/8" drywall for 7/8" the room is fundamentally the most dangerous place anyone could sit.... A true death trap


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 6:17 pm 
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Location: Comox, BC, CA
ADCO wrote:
newmusic wrote:
I just finished soundproofing my childrens bedrooms from my main listening room. I used all the techniques you previously mentioned. Plus I added several layers of mass loaded vinyl to their floor on top of a layer of special rubber. Also taped all the floor board seams and used noise calking around the perimeter seams of the room.
One layer of 7/8 drywall on top of your channel and genie clips will do little. I used two layers on my kids bedroom walls. And you also need to apply green glue between the layers. This is essential.
For my basement second sound room I wanted to be able to turn my stereo to eleven, and was not satisfied until I got up to 4 layers of 7/8 with green glue in between each. Roxul in between and mass loaded vinyl around all ductwork. Mufflers are also available to prevent sound from travelling to other rooms via the vents.

Contact Chris Makula at Wilrep Acoustiguard, tell him Paul Forbes recommended you (that's me), and he will hook you up.


I'm more than a little confused here.... First of all I have a commercial drywall / contracting company and have never heard of 7/8" drywall or ever heard of the very esoteric 1" varietal on a residential build... Ever .... Perhaps there is but it has never been spec'd on any of my projects....not so sure...Secondly it was mentioned that these 4 layers of 7/8" are hanging on resilient channel , that is roughly 11.5 pounds per ft by my calculation even if such a creature exists. Resilient channel is rated by the OBC to be exceptible up to approx 3 pounds per foot.... Now if we add approx another 1 pound per square foot with the addition to mass loaded vinyl we are north of 12 pounds per square foot.... A 10'x10' ceiling would then conservatively weigh 1200 pounds on something rated for around 300.... I assume the room is larger which is even more troublesome ..... If in fact this isn't a fairy tale

If this is true or even if the poster is mistaking 5/8" drywall for 7/8" the room is fundamentally the most dangerous place anyone could sit.... A true death trap


I'm not reading it that he used Genie Clips to hang the drywall from the ceiling but that he was telling the OP that using the clips and drywall would not get it done.

I think the four layers on the ceiling were glued and screwed to the joists -- though that would still be one heck of a mass.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 6:27 pm 
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Ya... I have re read that and am still not sure what's going on except to say that no matter how you look at it his description is 3.5 " of drywall and no matter how you look at that there is just a s..t load better ways to do this.... Not to mention that at those weights and the basic governing 40lb per sq ft static weight for a structure I'm sure the joist system is way overloaded , in particular remember there is furniture above your head as well....assuming we are talking about floor joist and worse if we are talking about engineered trusses...

We have been part of many high end theatre and isolated tech rooms and I have yet to see this spec, or anything like it in one of those builds....


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