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PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 2:41 pm 
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Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
finally finished with the new one this weekend
21/2" live edge red oak. purchased a 10ft piece and cut it to need. Threaded black pipe provides the vertical rise.
heavy bugger but solid
headphone stand courtesy of another CAM member.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 2:55 pm 
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Location: Vernon, BC, CA
Very cool! Lots of flexibility with a stand like that.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 4:27 pm 
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mpublicover wrote:
finally finished with the new one this weekend
21/2" live edge red oak. purchased a 10ft piece and cut it to need. Threaded black pipe provides the vertical rise.
heavy bugger but solid
headphone stand courtesy of another CAM member.
Attachment:
IMG_0814.JPG


Looks absolutely awesome, well done.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 7:48 pm 
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Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
thanks guys, it was a great project.
Wish I could have retained the bark but there were too many chunks already missing so I chose to remove the rest. Also would have loved to use some of the exotic woods available but the width was usually problematic, especially for a 10' piece. the cost of these can also extend beyond a grand.
Had the store I bought the wood at do the length cuts and the local Home Depot does pipe cutting and threading at no extra cost.
I essentially assembled and stained it. A sander, driver and level were all the tools I needed.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:20 pm 
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Location: Alberta, AB, CA
bumperdoo wrote:
To totally play with your mind, here's how I built my rack - it's dead silent i.e., won't resonate, so it's ideal.

Cement-bonded wood fibre cinder blocks and aluminum foam shelves.

Problem with wood is it resonates, the denser the wood, the longer the wavelength of resonance, so we completely avoided it in this build.

I like this simple set up you have makes buying wood and trying to construct something 'level' easier, thanks for sharing this one!

-- 12 Jun 2017 00:21 --

mpublicover wrote:
finally finished with the new one this weekend
21/2" live edge red oak. purchased a 10ft piece and cut it to need. Threaded black pipe provides the vertical rise.
heavy bugger but solid
headphone stand courtesy of another CAM member.
Attachment:
IMG_0814.JPG

Nice looking set up here too, did you have to stain the wood? Awesome!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:19 am 
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Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
rocketampz wrote:
bumperdoo wrote:
To totally play with your mind, here's how I built my rack - it's dead silent i.e., won't resonate, so it's ideal.

Cement-bonded wood fibre cinder blocks and aluminum foam shelves.

Problem with wood is it resonates, the denser the wood, the longer the wavelength of resonance, so we completely avoided it in this build.

I like this simple set up you have makes buying wood and trying to construct something 'level' easier, thanks for sharing this one!

-- 12 Jun 2017 00:21 --

mpublicover wrote:
finally finished with the new one this weekend
21/2" live edge red oak. purchased a 10ft piece and cut it to need. Threaded black pipe provides the vertical rise.
heavy bugger but solid
headphone stand courtesy of another CAM member.
Attachment:
IMG_0814.JPG

Nice looking set up here too, did you have to stain the wood? Awesome!

I did have to sand and stain. I didn't fuss over it too much though. Oak takes stain very well so only a single coat of gel stain and finished with rub on poly. Could have been a one day project if not for drying time.
Levelling is accomplished by using threaded pipe so there is about an inch of play on those. I thought of painting them but purchased the black pipe and the wall flanges have a bronzed appearance so it worked for the look I was going for.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:16 pm 
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Location: Riverview, NB, CA
That looks very nice Mr. Publicover! I really like the livedge oak with the pipe. I didn't know that HD cut and threaded pipe so I'll file that gem away for a similar shelf I want to make for non-audio purposes. I bet that system sounds great!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 1:59 pm 
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Location: Burlington, ON, CA
I like the customization of a flexy rack to something really special.

Nice choice on the shelf material!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 8:51 am 
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Location: Calgary, AB, CA
I absolutely love this discussion, so much great creative DIY work! I posted earlier about using tubing to cover the ready-rod, and took some advice offered here in my recent equipment stand build - see attached photo. The room is small, so it is tough to do much better without obscuring the view of the stand.

I laminated 3/4" Baltic birch ply with 1/2" MDF using screws & glue, and edged it all with solid maple (leftover materials I had on had at the time). 5/8" ready rod and 1 1/4" anodized aluminum tubing, electrical tape wrapped around the nuts to hold the tubing firm and dampened. Precise cutting of tubing on a radial arm saw and careful assembly gives you tight tubing. I would have liked to use 3/4" ready rod, but that would have made it tough to find appropriate tubing that met my aesthetic goals.

It is hard to see in the photo due to the optical distortion, but each shelf space gets slightly taller as you move downwards: 6 3/4", 7 3/4", 8 1/2", 9".

This unit replaces my original 'flexi' rack, which I had outgrown and discovered 'sounded bad' with 3/4" ply, 1/2" rod and 1" aluminum tubes. This new one is a great success, much quieter and better sounding! The next rabbit hole for me is more isolation & damping of individual components. With this new rack I can clearly hear changes with every experiment I try, so I am gratified. Thinking of DIY roller blocks now...


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:00 am 
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Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
nice clean look there. you must have some practice with the maple edging.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:53 pm 
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Location: scarborough, ON, CA
mission66 wrote:
I absolutely love this discussion, so much great creative DIY work! I posted earlier about using tubing to cover the ready-rod, and took some advice offered here in my recent equipment stand build - see attached photo. The room is small, so it is tough to do much better without obscuring the view of the stand.

I laminated 3/4" Baltic birch ply with 1/2" MDF using screws & glue, and edged it all with solid maple (leftover materials I had on had at the time). 5/8" ready rod and 1 1/4" anodized aluminum tubing, electrical tape wrapped around the nuts to hold the tubing firm and dampened. Precise cutting of tubing on a radial arm saw and careful assembly gives you tight tubing. I would have liked to use 3/4" ready rod, but that would have made it tough to find appropriate tubing that met my aesthetic goals.

It is hard to see in the photo due to the optical distortion, but each shelf space gets slightly taller as you move downwards: 6 3/4", 7 3/4", 8 1/2", 9".

This unit replaces my original 'flexi' rack, which I had outgrown and discovered 'sounded bad' with 3/4" ply, 1/2" rod and 1" aluminum tubes. This new one is a great success, much quieter and better sounding! The next rabbit hole for me is more isolation & damping of individual components. With this new rack I can clearly hear changes with every experiment I try, so I am gratified. Thinking of DIY roller blocks now...

Looks great.
What did you use to cap the top of the rod (top shelf) and on the bottom (floor)?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 5:44 pm 
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Location: Calgary, AB, CA
Sorry guys, I was travelling and didn't see your entries on this thread. I searched out the topic to see if I missed anything and I did!

The maple edging is actually solid 1" wrapping around all 4 sides for visual purposes, and also so I could clamp the shelves together and belt sand 5 corners at once for uniformity. Rough rounding on the corners was done with a crude template and a router bit with a template guide bearing.

The tops of the 'rods' are actually 2 1/2" carriage bolts that go through the top shelf and are mated with coupling nuts (2" long) and washers on the underside. Then the ready-rod is threaded into the coupler nuts and I worked my way down with regular nuts, washers, aluminum tubes etc. You have to assemble upside down. After the last shelf (bottom) is on the rods, I added 6 more coupling nuts, and threaded in 2 1/2" carriage bolts again with a regular nut to 'lock' when the units was levelled. So, the feet are actually the dome of the carriage bolt on the old linoleum floor. I probably would have put some thin felt on them if I did it over, as they will mark the floor. A little on the industrial looking side, but not bad.

5/8" ready rod 6 pcs. x 36" , 5/8" coupler nuts 12 pcs., 5/8" regular nuts 60 pcs. 9/16" washers 60 pcs. (5/8" washers are too big), 1 1/4" anodized aluminum tubing 18', 1 roll of electrical tape to wrap the nuts for a friction fit with the tubing. And shelves of course. Thought about buying laminated bamboo, but it would have been pricey or the wrong final size I was looking for so I just used what I had left over in my shop which just gave me the width and depth I wanted.

Can't help but wonder if Bamboo would be a better choice for vibration damping, but the 1/2" MDF glued & screwed to 3/4" Baltic Birch seems pretty good. A noticeable improvement in clarity. Interesting note, whenever I make changes that improve the clarity & resolution of my system, it seems that the perceived sound volume drops a little - I find myself turning up the volume control a little more. Either that or I am finally going deaf.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:24 pm 
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Location: kamloops, BC, CA
There was a person who a few years ago built a mission style equipment rack if they are still around could you repost your pictures


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:07 pm 
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Location: Winnipeg, MB, CA
added a back to mine as the cabling was a distraction. The new speakers help with the overall look as well.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 6:05 am 
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Location: niagara falls, ON, CA
mission66 wrote:
Sorry guys, I was travelling and didn't see your entries on this thread. I searched out the topic to see if I missed anything and I did!

The maple edging is actually solid 1" wrapping around all 4 sides for visual purposes, and also so I could clamp the shelves together and belt sand 5 corners at once for uniformity. Rough rounding on the corners was done with a crude template and a router bit with a template guide bearing.

The tops of the 'rods' are actually 2 1/2" carriage bolts that go through the top shelf and are mated with coupling nuts (2" long) and washers on the underside. Then the ready-rod is threaded into the coupler nuts and I worked my way down with regular nuts, washers, aluminum tubes etc. You have to assemble upside down. After the last shelf (bottom) is on the rods, I added 6 more coupling nuts, and threaded in 2 1/2" carriage bolts again with a regular nut to 'lock' when the units was levelled. So, the feet are actually the dome of the carriage bolt on the old linoleum floor. I probably would have put some thin felt on them if I did it over, as they will mark the floor. A little on the industrial looking side, but not bad.

5/8" ready rod 6 pcs. x 36" , 5/8" coupler nuts 12 pcs., 5/8" regular nuts 60 pcs. 9/16" washers 60 pcs. (5/8" washers are too big), 1 1/4" anodized aluminum tubing 18', 1 roll of electrical tape to wrap the nuts for a friction fit with the tubing. And shelves of course. Thought about buying laminated bamboo, but it would have been pricey or the wrong final size I was looking for so I just used what I had left over in my shop which just gave me the width and depth I wanted.

Can't help but wonder if Bamboo would be a better choice for vibration damping, but the 1/2" MDF glued & screwed to 3/4" Baltic Birch seems pretty good. A noticeable improvement in clarity. Interesting note, whenever I make changes that improve the clarity & resolution of my system, it seems that the perceived sound volume drops a little - I find myself turning up the volume control a little more. Either that or I am finally going deaf.



i made a couple of these stands and the last one i made i used cooper pipe insulation on the threaded rod under the aluminum tubing, it stopped the ringing in the aluminum tube. to check just finger flick the tube and does it ring or is there a thud. the less ring the better your table will sound. another tip is use a solid piece of rod and build the table upside down and start at the top and use your aluminum pipe as spacers and when you get to the bottom you can put a coupling nut on the threaded rod to add a spike or a foot.
john


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