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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:47 am 
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Leave them as-is and call them relics!

A brand new beat up Fender Strat costs more than a brand new brand new shiny one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro4pyzo-fjI


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 1:14 pm 
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Michael F wrote:
Philosophil wrote:
Wow, there are some really interesting suggestions here. I'll definitely check out all those options to see what might work best for me.

I've never worked with Bondo before, but I have done a little spackling. How easy is Bondo to sand?


It`s a little tougher to sand and shape than plastic wood type fillers but its much more durable, adheres better to a well prepped surface and doesn't contract or expand with temperature swings.
It's also the filler of choice for use on MDF.

It's not impossible to sand but it is quite hard. The best thing is to plane it down flush to the surface when it's still setting up, in a state autobody workers call 'cheese'. Done correctly, there will be very little sanding needed.

If that sounds too challenging, a better alternative to spackle is Sheetrock 45, which sets up quickly and doesn't shrink. It's much easier to sand as well though it is harder than spackle. Since it's water based it still needs time to dry even after it's hardened, whereas Bondo can be coated over almost right away.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 2:53 pm 
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OBI56 wrote:

No matter what method you use to refinish them, the prep work is the most important part. Sand, fill and re-sand till they are smooth, then refinish.


I agree its most important. And if you want to go even further apply a coat or two of epoxy primer and sand some more, if its a sand able type. That acts as a surface leveler sealer and very minor imperfection filler after initial filling and sanding steps have been taken. By the time you apply finish primer it should look perfect. Depending on personal technique of course. If your applying a high gloss smooth finish the additional steps will really pay off.

The bed liner is great stuff, you have probably seen it on PA speakers the last time you intended a live event.

-- 27 Aug 2015 23:04 --

Philosophil wrote:
I've never worked with Bondo before, but I have done a little spackling. How easy is Bondo to sand?


The lighter bondo is easy to sand but it can (and usually does) chip and crack rather easily, not sure if its the best stuff to use here. You can get other types with carbon additives, tougher to sand but its more durable. My choice is short strand fibre glass fillers. You just have to add hardener and apply. Its tougher to sand stuff, but again more durable. As ripblade was explaining you get it with a "cheese grader" before it sets up before you start your sanding. Then again on such small areas you may be fine with a course paper since there isnt a lot to take down. The short strand might be over kill, but its another option. You could also use epoxy resin to fill the holes.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:35 pm 
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The cheese grater is what body shops use...for cabinetry you want a plane, block or smoothing or what have you...it will do a better job at leveling flat surfaces.

If the imperfections are small, glazing putty available at automotive supply shops is a good option too, and is easier to sand.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:16 pm 
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Don't those already have a textured finish on them? If so, you will have to sand all of that off before you refinish. If that is the case, maybe a spray-on texturedfinish would be best.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:03 pm 
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OBI56 wrote:
Don't those already have a textured finish on them? If so, you will have to sand all of that off before you refinish. If that is the case, maybe a spray-on texturedfinish would be best.

They do. As a result I'm going to try the truck bed liner spray, as I think that is more in keeping with the original finish. I plan to start the sanding and such this weekend and take it from there.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:44 pm 
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ripblade wrote:
The cheese grater is what body shops use...for cabinetry you want a plane, block or smoothing or what have you...it will do a better job at leveling flat surfaces.

If the imperfections are small, glazing putty available at automotive supply shops is a good option too, and is easier to sand.

Looking at them again, most of the marks are pretty superficial. While I did buy some Bondo, I think I might be able to get away with the glazing putty (which I also picked up).

Again, I've never used glazing putty before, but I assume you would just spread it over the dings with a putty knife and sand it after. I assume by 'cheese grater', people mean something like a rasp? I wouldn't use a rasp on these. I have a few planes, but I think I'll stick to sandpaper for this.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:11 pm 
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You can do it with Duratex

http://www.loudspeakers.ca/Qmedia/Duratex01.pdf

https://www.google.ca/search?q=duratex+ ... kgodkloK4w


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:22 am 
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Philosophil wrote:
ripblade wrote:
The cheese grater is what body shops use...for cabinetry you want a plane, block or smoothing or what have you...it will do a better job at leveling flat surfaces.

If the imperfections are small, glazing putty available at automotive supply shops is a good option too, and is easier to sand.

Looking at them again, most of the marks are pretty superficial. While I did buy some Bondo, I think I might be able to get away with the glazing putty (which I also picked up).

Again, I've never used glazing putty before, but I assume you would just spread it over the dings with a putty knife and sand it after. I assume by 'cheese grater', people mean something like a rasp? I wouldn't use a rasp on these. I have a few planes, but I think I'll stick to sandpaper for this.
The cutting action is similar to a rasp, but you wouldn't want to use a rasp as the teeth would very quickly become clogged and useless.

If you're going with truck bed liner you probably don't need to worry about superficial imperfections. Isn't that stuff quite thick and slightly textured?

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:36 am 
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ripblade wrote:
Philosophil wrote:
ripblade wrote:
The cheese grater is what body shops use...for cabinetry you want a plane, block or smoothing or what have you...it will do a better job at leveling flat surfaces.

If the imperfections are small, glazing putty available at automotive supply shops is a good option too, and is easier to sand.

Looking at them again, most of the marks are pretty superficial. While I did buy some Bondo, I think I might be able to get away with the glazing putty (which I also picked up).

Again, I've never used glazing putty before, but I assume you would just spread it over the dings with a putty knife and sand it after. I assume by 'cheese grater', people mean something like a rasp? I wouldn't use a rasp on these. I have a few planes, but I think I'll stick to sandpaper for this.
The cutting action is similar to a rasp, but you wouldn't want to use a rasp as the teeth would very quickly become clogged and useless.

If you're going with truck bed liner you probably don't need to worry about superficial imperfections. Isn't that stuff quite thick and slightly textured?

Yes it is (at least that's my impression), so I can probably get by with very minor imperfections. I'll try it on a test piece first to see how it looks and performs out of the can, but I will still try to get the cabinets fairly 'clean' before doing the painting. I probably won't get started at it until tomorrow. I just hope the weather cooperates, as I prefer to do this stuff in my driveway in the open air when possible.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:08 am 
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Phil, no need to remind you that the time and care you take to mask off the parts you DON'T want to paint are also important in terms of the look of the final project. Masking or painter's tape is cheap.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:21 am 
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The "cheese grater" file is way too aggressive for what you need!
Attachment:
cheese grater.jpg
cheese grater.jpg [ 27.1 KiB | Viewed 603 times ]
Attachment:
cheesegrater bondo.jpg
cheesegrater bondo.jpg [ 26.26 KiB | Viewed 603 times ]



Spot putty would likely do the trick, but if you are going to use the EZ Liner product you won't even need the spot putty, those minor imperfections won't be noticeable. Prep is still important though, as good adhesion depends on it!
Best of luck with the project!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:35 am 
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Superficial scratches and such are ok, just sand smooth as planned. I would however not leave any holes, hit them with the putty its cheap insurance. The liner will cover the holes but also might cause small sunken spots at the surface, I have had that happen even with thick spray on material.


Last edited by sublimesounds on Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:38 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:37 am 
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OBI56 wrote:
Phil, no need to remind you that the time and care you take to mask off the parts you DON'T want to paint are also important in terms of the look of the final project. Masking or painter's tape is cheap.

Thanks for the reminder, OB. We have plenty of painter's tape in the house so that shouldn't be a problem (I hope!).

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:41 am 
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Good tape! dont skimp and get cheap stuff it can bleed and make a mess of your work, so can tape thats sat around a year or two the glue can change. I dont risk it Ill always get a fresh roll. Again cheap insurance.


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