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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 7:42 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2005 11:47 am
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Location: Ottawa, ON, CA
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Does any one have any recommendations for an outdoor TV antenna
that would be mounted on the roof of our house ?

In the Ottawa area - there are 2 transmitting antennas
One at Camp Fortune and the other somewhere near Manotick.
So in our location, would need an antenna design that will work for 180 degrees.

Plus I would prefer something low key.
I'm not going to mount a massive array on my roof.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:16 am 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
https://www.antennasdirect.com/store/Cl ... Mount.html


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:41 am 
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lzp1 wrote:
https://www.antennasdirect.com/store/ClearStream_2V_UHF_VHF_Indoor_Outdoor_DTV_Antenna_With_Mount.html
Do you have any experience with this one, as compared to any other?

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:21 pm 
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Location: Charlottetown, PE, CA
Digitalhome.ca had an OTA section regularly updated with antenna models and current OTA broadcast activity. I built a Grayhoverman antenna for myself and 2 more for family after visiting their site.

A local source for OTA products in your area is saveandreplay.com

TVfool.com will let you know the azimuth you need to point at and the gain you will need to recieve your local channels.

Good luck. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:03 pm 
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Location: GTA, ON, CA
You may be able to use a less massive array with the help of an UHF/VHF preamp, such as Channel Master 7777, more info at this link :

http://worldwidesatellites.com/channel- ... p-440.html


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 3:09 pm 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
Go to tvfool.com , punch in your postal code, and it will tell you how many channels you can get with what type of antenna. So you will know whether 4-bay will work, or you need 8-bay, or you need a big Yagi type antenna.

Antenna type is very specific to your location, elevation, stuff blocking line of sight, etc.

Regarding preamps - preamp is only as good as your antenna - if antenna cannot receive the channel at all, preamp will just obviously amplify noise. If you have weak channels, which get flaky with the weather changes, or you have a long cable run from antenna to TV, preamp will help in those situations.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 3:15 pm 
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Location: Ottawa, ON, CA
Thanks for the suggestions.
Antenna height is quite important, so presently have our antenna in the attic.
However, the shingles on our bungalow disintegrated
so just had them replaced with a metal roof.
But that seems to have shielded our receiving antenna.
Now have to put the antenna on the roof.

Was using an antenna similar to this one - called a DB2.

Specs have its gain listed as 11.4 dB's.

However, before mounting an antenna on the roof and re routing the cable,
thought I would see if there was something better.
Plus, I wonder how well this will stand up to Ottawa's winters.

Image

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:17 pm 
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Location: Ottawa, ON, CA
zhenya01 wrote:
Go to tvfool.com , punch in your postal code, and it will tell you how many channels you can get with what type of antenna. So you will know whether 4-bay will work, or you need 8-bay, or you need a big Yagi type antenna.

Antenna type is very specific to your location, elevation, stuff blocking line of sight, etc.

Regarding preamps - preamp is only as good as your antenna - if antenna cannot receive the channel at all, preamp will just obviously amplify noise. If you have weak channels, which get flaky with the weather changes, or you have a long cable run from antenna to TV, preamp will help in those situations.


Thanks for this.
I already had the TVfool.com printout in front of me.
In the Ottawa area - one transmitting antenna is at the top of Camp Fortune.
While the other one is near Manotick.
From where I live TV fool says they are 159 degrees apart.

Looking on the web, turns out TV antennas can be ordered from Staples on line.
http://www.staples.ca/en/TV-Antennas/ca ... CA_1_20001

They have antennas from a company called Lava - but they are active antennas
and really didn't want to get into that.

However, they also carry antennas from a company called Digiwave.
http://www.staples.ca/en/Digiwave-0-8GH ... CA_1_20001
This looks like it can handle the elements better than a bay type of antenna.
and the gain is listed at 15 dB's.

Also - dare I even mention the "C" word (Cables).
Turns out Belden RG-6 1694A looks pretty good - but don't know who carries it in Ontario.
But I see Take Five Audio carries Belden RG-59/U 1505A


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 5:30 pm 
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Location: GTA, ON, CA
Less massive antenna with preamp does not get you more channels than massive antenna array, but may get you equal number of watchable channels than massive antenna without preamp, depending on how many weak signals one is getting, since one of the objective is to avoid using massive antenna, if a compact and high gain antenna is not available, a preamp could be an option.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 5:07 am 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
ripblade wrote:
lzp1 wrote:
https://www.antennasdirect.com/store/ClearStream_2V_UHF_VHF_Indoor_Outdoor_DTV_Antenna_With_Mount.html
Do you have any experience with this one, as compared to any other?

My experience with this has been very good.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 7:31 am 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
Uunderhill wrote:
zhenya01 wrote:
Go to tvfool.com , punch in your postal code, and it will tell you how many channels you can get with what type of antenna. So you will know whether 4-bay will work, or you need 8-bay, or you need a big Yagi type antenna.

Antenna type is very specific to your location, elevation, stuff blocking line of sight, etc.

Regarding preamps - preamp is only as good as your antenna - if antenna cannot receive the channel at all, preamp will just obviously amplify noise. If you have weak channels, which get flaky with the weather changes, or you have a long cable run from antenna to TV, preamp will help in those situations.


Thanks for this.
I already had the TVfool.com printout in front of me.
In the Ottawa area - one transmitting antenna is at the top of Camp Fortune.
While the other one is near Manotick.
From where I live TV fool says they are 159 degrees apart.

Looking on the web, turns out TV antennas can be ordered from Staples on line.
http://www.staples.ca/en/TV-Antennas/ca ... CA_1_20001

They have antennas from a company called Lava - but they are active antennas
and really didn't want to get into that.

However, they also carry antennas from a company called Digiwave.
http://www.staples.ca/en/Digiwave-0-8GH ... CA_1_20001
This looks like it can handle the elements better than a bay type of antenna.
and the gain is listed at 15 dB's.

Also - dare I even mention the "C" word (Cables).
Turns out Belden RG-6 1694A looks pretty good - but don't know who carries it in Ontario.
But I see Take Five Audio carries Belden RG-59/U 1505A


So, 159 degrees apart pretty much rules out one of the transmitters, unless one of the receivers is much closer and powerful, so that you can receive it on the back of your antenna (for example, my 8-bay antenna with preamp is pointed at Buffalo, but receives one strong Barrie channel, which is exactly in the opposite direction).

You can obviously go with 2 antennas and a coupler, if it's worth the trouble.

What's the distance to the transmitters? If DB2 worked in the attic just fine, then obviously DB2 on the roof (much higher) will work as well. I rarely used 2-bay antennas in my installs, as 4-bay is generally more powerful and acceptable for most people (for almost same price), but if 4-bay does not offer any benefits (i.e. no extra channels), then just use the same 2-bay - DB2 is a great antenna.

One main thing about installing outside - you must ground the mounting structure, and run your cable through the grounding block. It's not complicated, but adds significant time to the install (hammering the grounding rod, running ground wire, connecting all equipment on the roof to the ground, etc.).

If you want good sources for antennas, try these stores: http://www.saveandreplay.com/ and https://angelelectronics.ca/shop/ota


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 6:45 am 
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Location: Markham, ON, CA
Check this out: Nippon Antenna
http://www.karmond.com


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:00 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2005 11:47 am
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Location: Ottawa, ON, CA
zhenya01 wrote:
One main thing about installing outside - you must ground the mounting structure, and run your cable through the grounding block. It's not complicated, but adds significant time to the install (hammering the grounding rod, running ground wire, connecting all equipment on the roof to the ground, etc.).

If you want good sources for antennas, try these stores: http://www.saveandreplay.com/ and https://angelelectronics.ca/shop/ota

Thanks for the info.

Actually, to mount the antenna, I was thinking of just using a PVC pipe attached to the metal roof
Think the pipe I have in the attic has an O.D. = 1 1/8"
the wall thickness is about an 1/8" so it has some flex but is reasonably rigged.

The issue I'm wondering is how well will a bay antenna work with the elements ?
Will it still work in rain and snow ?

.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:43 am 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
Uunderhill wrote:
zhenya01 wrote:
One main thing about installing outside - you must ground the mounting structure, and run your cable through the grounding block. It's not complicated, but adds significant time to the install (hammering the grounding rod, running ground wire, connecting all equipment on the roof to the ground, etc.).

If you want good sources for antennas, try these stores: http://www.saveandreplay.com/ and https://angelelectronics.ca/shop/ota

Thanks for the info.

Actually, to mount the antenna, I was thinking of just using a PVC pipe attached to the metal roof
Think the pipe I have in the attic has an O.D. = 1 1/8"
the wall thickness is about an 1/8" so it has some flex but is reasonably rigged.

The issue I'm wondering is how well will a bay antenna work with the elements ?
Will it still work in rain and snow ?

.
These things were designed to survive the elements, so should last quite awhile. Of course, quality plays a major role in how long it lasts.

I would think a metal mast is preferable to a plastic one as it improves grounding of the ground plane reflector, which in turn improves signal. What scares me off from mounting my own antenna outdoors is finding the best location for optimal reception. If you're familiar with 'picket fencing' in car reception you already know how critical placement is.

Direction is important too, even with a 4 or 8 bay bowtie antenna. In order to tape the recent Hip concert I had to rotate my antenna about 20° more eastward in order get 100% reception on the CBC, even though the CN tower is less than 5Kms from me. Doing so noticeably worsened reception of the Buffalo stations to the south, so I put it back the way it was afterwards. A mast rotor with remote control is pretty much a necessity if the signals come from even moderately disparate locations.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:21 pm 
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Location: Toronto, ON, CA
Don't use plastic pipe. Considering that it most likely will crack due to wind loads and temperature cycles outside, now your only metal path will be coax cable between antenna and your TV - BTW, that one also has to be broken and grounded at the antenna end.


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